NOTE 23 January 2014: New posts are no longer posted to this blog. New stuff at my new blog, Please go there! All old and new posts are there, and you can also comment, too!

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Raleigh Crested Butte: Dialing it in

Oh, the irony. I always hate it when my boss uses the term "dial it in."

Anyways, I've been riding the Raleigh Crested Butte A LOT lately. I've alternated between it and the Raleigh Wayfarer as my primary daily bikes. (Oh poor Long Haul Trucker, I promise to ride you soon!) I've really gotten use and come to like it's long wheelbase and relaxed ride. And I've done a couple more things to make it better to me.

Yep, I put a Brooks saddle on it. It was inevitable, right? A Brooks ends up on all my bikes, eventually. I put the Avocet saddle through the test, and while I warmed up somewhat to it towards the end, in the end I wanted a Brooks. So I managed to snag a used B67 off Craigslist for only $60. (I have a $60 rule with used Brooks.) It is a bit worn, but not overly so. A bit stretched to, but I tightened it up.

And strapped to the Brooks is of course my older Carradice Nelson Longflap saddlebag. I think they look quite handsome together.

At this point, there's not much else I need or want to do to this bike. While dynamo lighting would be nice, the Cygolite is doing a good job for now. Dynolighting is on the long-range calendar. And I know I'll need to do something about the drivetrain at some point, but right now it's doing okay so I'll ride it some more until it really gives me grief. Beyond these two things, everything is minor, like getting new grips, or changing the kickstand, or overhauling wheels.

Now I need to actually get this bike on some dirt...


  1. Looking good, I've been eyeing up an additional, larger Carradice bag for some time. For the time being it will remain a wish.

    One thing I've been wondering for a while is how well a front basket works with the bike's purpose of riding in the rough stuff. The Kona Africa's folding basket, whilst a brilliant idea for road riding, didn't hold up all that well when used on canal towpaths, and my impression is that you will be wanting to travel on surfaces rougher than those.

    1. I haven't really "put it to the test" regarding Rough Stuff yet, so we'll see how it works. (Grant Petersen seems to do okay with a basket on rough surfaces, but then again, he's Grant Petersen.) The good thing about this setup is the basket is easily removable, as it's lashed to the front rack. So I can always take it off for rough stuff.

  2. I too have sort of wanted another bicycle in a similar vein. My previous "second" bicycle was a Novara Safari REI's so-called "adventure touring" ride. It could take fat tires and was more mountain-bikey so I always kept that for more off-road focused tours. However the Atlantis made it clear to me that the bicycle just didn't fit me well and it wasn't comfortable (plus aluminum really does ride harsh). So off it went. But still would like something similar.

    This bicycle is pretty sweet I have to say and you've got it nicely set up. I've been meaning to put a basket on my bicycle for it's currently mostly errand running incarnation but you know slack. The only thing I'd note is it looks like the frame is a bit small - lot of seatpost/handlebar rise to get it where you want, no?

    1. Robert, it is a tad "small", but I don't know if it would be much of an improvement if I got a slightly larger size. It has to do with its weird old-skool geometery. That top tube is pretty long, so if I got a bigger size, I would have less seatpost/handlebar rise, but I would also be more stretched out.


I'm no longer allowing new comments on this blog. You can comment on the exact same post on the new blog. Go find it over at

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.